Leymah Gbowie_389x292As I prepare to recieve my editor’s first notes, this week, I am going through messages and comments from readers on re-reading sections of the manuscript, and re-visiting some of the reading, listening and watching (otherwise known as research) which inspired me to write As Long As She Lives.

I do my best, as a writer, to make sure that the book is, first and foremost, an entertaining read – the last thing I want to do is to preach to anyone – but I do hold an underlying hope that if readers relate to Cait, they might also find themselves interested in the plight of non-fictional girls like her students, living in non-fictional countries similar to my fictional one.

In my preparation, today, I came across my bookmark for this video, filmed in March 2012, and it occurred to me that if, in my own much tinier capacity than Nobel laureate Leymah Gbowee, I have sparked some curiosity, it might be useful if – just occasionally – I share some of the sources which I found so inspirational, during my own research.

And so I begin by sharing this TED talk by Leymah Gbowee, peace activist, women’s activist and 2011 Nobel Peace Prize recipient. You can find out more about her at her site www.leymahgbowee.com, in her book “Mighty be our Powers: How Sisterhood, Prayer, and Sex Changed a Nation at War” and, of course a brief insight and more referencesWikipedia,

Leymah Gbowee: Unlock the Intelligence, Passion, Greatness of Girls